Canine

Vaccines

Q: At what age should my puppy start receiving vaccines?

A: We recommend starting vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age.

Q: What vaccines should my puppy receive?

A: At your puppies first visit it will receive a DHLPP (Canine Distemper) vaccine. This vaccine needs to be boostered every 3-4 weeks until your puppy is 16 weeks of age. We recommend vaccinating Rottweilers and Dobermans for DHLPP out to 20 weeks of age.
We also recommend vaccinating your puppy for KENNEL COUGH or BORDETELLA, which is usually given at 12-16 weeks of age. This vaccine is highly recommended for puppies who are taken to a groomer, participating in training classes, being hospitalized for SPAYING or NEUTERING, or are frequently around other dogs. Canine Flu vaccines are recommended for dogs that train or board frequently.
Your puppy will also receive a RABIES vaccine after 12 weeks of age.

Q: Once my puppy is 16 weeks of age and has received all of its puppy vaccines, when do they need to be vaccinated again?

A: The DHLPP vaccine is a yearly vaccine and needs to boostered again in 1 year. Following this vaccine, DHLPP can be boostered every 1 - 3 years. Our vets will determine the frequency of this vaccine.
The BORDETELLA or KENNEL COUGH is a yearly vaccine and needs to boostered again in 1 year, it will then need to be boostered every year for the life of the pet.
The RABIES vaccine will need to be boostered again in 1 year as well. Although in the state of Virginia each subsequent RABIES vaccine is good for 3 years. Canine Flu vaccines are boostered yearly.

Q: How often does my pet need a physical exam?

A: Our veterinarians recommend yearly physical exams regardless of vaccine status. Bi-annual exams are recommended for all geriatric pets.



Heartworms

Q: What are Heartworms?

A: Heartworms are parasites that live in the blood stream, heart, and large blood vessels of the lungs.

Q: How does my dog acquire heartworms?

A: They are transmitted through the bite of a mosquito. A mosquito becomes infected with micofilariae (heartworm larvae) when it takes a blood meal from an infected dog. When the mosquito feeds again the larvae enter the dogs body through the bite wound. These larvae eventually travel to the heart where they develop into adult heartworms. Once they reach the heart they can cause heart failure, liver and kidney disease, or even death.

Q: How can I find out if my dog has Heartworms?

A: If your dog is 6 months or older we recommend an occult blood test to detect the presence of adult heartworms. This is performed in our office with a small sample of your dogs blood. We can have the results in approximately 8 minutes.

Q: How can I prevent my dog from getting Heartworms?

A: Once your dog tests negative for heartworms, we recommend putting all dogs on a once a month preventative to prevent them from acquiring heartworms, the preventative usually comes in tablet form. Once your dog is on the preventative year round, we recommend retesting every 2 years.
Puppies under 6 months of age are put on heartworm preventative immediately without testing.

Q: If my dog tests positive for Heartworms, can it be treated?

A: If your dog has tested positive for Heartworms , for your dog's health and well being, prompt veterinary treatment is vital. If left untreated, heartworms can cause congestive heart failure and ultimately death. Steps must be take to both eliminate the worms and to prevent a re-infection. We perform the treatment with the most effective and safe drug currently available, "Immiticide".



MISC.

Q: What if I think my puppy has worms?

A: Your puppy may have some loose stool/diarrhea, a bloated belly, vomit occasionally, or some owners will even see "worms" in their puppies stool or vomit. These are some indications of possible INTESTINAL PARASITES. This is why we recommend bringing a stool sample to your puppies first visit so that we may determine if your puppy has INTESTINAL PARASITES and if so what kind. At which time we will dispense an oral medication to treat your puppy for INTESTINAL PARASITES. Once the oral medication has been administered , we may recommend rechecking a stool sample.

Q: Why should I have my dog spayed or neutered?

A: View our Spay & Neuter services.

Q: Why does my dog have have bad breath?

A: Periodontal disease can cause bad breath as well as lead to soreness and destruction of the gums and loose or missing teeth. Plaque builds up on the groove between teeth and gums, causing irritation, redness, and swelling. Eventually pockets form and deepen, allowing bacteria to damage the tissues that hold teeth in place. Bacteria from the teeth have a clear path to the animal's bloodstream and vital organs. This can cause infections of these vital organs which in return can shorten the life of your pet.

Q: I'm having trouble "potty-training" my puppy, what do you recommend?

A: Patience and consistency is the key to successful potty training. We recommend taking your puppy outside first thing in the morning, after each meal/nap, and before bedtime. Limit water intake 2 hours before bedtime. With a little patience, your puppy will be potty trained in no time. We also have handouts on crate training at our facility.



Flea Control

Q: I have seen fleas on my pet what should I do?

A: We recommend treating your home as well as your pet for fleas. For your pet, we recommend a "spot-on" product that kills fleas and ticks. For your home, we recommend a combination of household flea "bombs" and an area treatment spray. Please contact our office and we can determine the right combination of products for your home and your pet.




Feline

Vaccines

Q: At what age should my kitten start receiving vaccines?

A: We recommend starting vaccines at 8-10 weeks of age.

Q: What vaccines should my kitten receive?

A: At your kitten's first visit it will receive a FVRCP (Feline Distemper) vaccine. This vaccine needs to be boostered 3-4 weeks later.
We also recommend vaccinating kittens, who spend time outdoors, for FeLV (Feline Leukemia) vaccine. This vaccine is usually given at 10-12 weeks of age and reboostered 3-4 weeks later. Your kitten will also receive a rabies vaccine after 12 weeks of age.

Q: Once my kitten is 16 weeks of age and has received all its kitten vaccines, when do they need to be vaccinated agains?

A: The FVRCP and FeLV vaccines are yearly vaccines and need to be boostered again in 1 year. FVRCP and FeLV can be boostered every 1-3 years. Our vets will determine the frequency of this vaccine.
The RABIES vaccine will need to be boostered again in 1 year as well. Although in the state of Virginia each subsequent RABIES vaccine is good for 3 years.

Q: How often does my pet need a physical exam?

A: Our veterinarians recommend yearly physical exams regardless of vaccine status. Bi-annual exams are recommended for all geriatric pets.


MISC.

Q: Should I have my kitten tested for Feline Leukemia (FeLV) and Feline AIDS (FIV)?

A: We currently recommend testing all kittens and cats for FeLV/FIV. This is usually done at their first visit, and the test is performed in our office with a small sample of your cats blood. We can have the results in approximatey 10 minutes.

Q: Why should I have my cat spayed or neutered?

A: View our Spay & Neuter services.

Q: What if I think my kitten has worms?

A: Your kitten may have some loose stool/diarrhea, a bloated belly, vomit occasionally, or some owners will even see "worms" in their kittens stool or vomit. These are some indications of possible INTESTINAL PARASITES. This is why we recommend bringing a stool sample to your kittens first visit so that we may determine if your kitten has INTESTINAL PARASITES and if so what kind. At which time we will dispense an oral medication to treat your kitten for INTESTINAL PARASITES.

Q: Why does my cat have have bad breath?

A: Periodontal disease can cause bad breath as well as lead to soreness and destruction of the gums and loose or missing teeth. Plaque builds up on the groove between teeth and gums, causing irritation, redness, and swelling. Eventually pockets form and deepen, allowing bacteria to damage the tissues that hold teeth in place. Bacteria from the teeth have a clear path to the animal's bloodstream and vital organs. This can cause infections of these vital organs which in return can shorten the life of your pet.


Flea Control

Q: I have seen fleas on my pet what should I do?

A: We recommend treating your home as well as your pet for fleas. For your pet, we recommend a "spot-on" product that kills fleas and ticks. For your home, we recommend a combination of household flea "bombs" and an area treatment spray. Please contact our office and we can determine the right combination of products for your home and your pet.